@7 months ago with 116 notes
#twin towers #9/11 
Bride and some of her attendants on a windy wedding day, Odessa, Ukraine, 2000. Photo by Martin Parr, Magnum Photos.
This morning Italian journalist and blogger Michele Smargiassi / Fotocrazia mentioned The Living Image in today’s post. It’s in Italian but do read it if you can: Michele reflects on the reality of social weddings, the uncle Bob phenomenon and its role in relationship with professional photography (not necessarily limited to weddings). 
By the way, here is a pic by Martin Parr kinda doing the uncle Bob at someone’s wedding in Greece (before the internet was cool though). 
 

Bride and some of her attendants on a windy wedding day, Odessa, Ukraine, 2000. Photo by Martin Parr, Magnum Photos.

This morning Italian journalist and blogger Michele Smargiassi / Fotocrazia mentioned The Living Image in today’s post. It’s in Italian but do read it if you can: Michele reflects on the reality of social weddings, the uncle Bob phenomenon and its role in relationship with professional photography (not necessarily limited to weddings). 

By the way, here is a pic by Martin Parr kinda doing the uncle Bob at someone’s wedding in Greece (before the internet was cool though). 

 

@8 months ago with 2 notes
#wedding #photojournalism #michele smargiassi #bride #martin parr #Magnum #magnum photos #greece 

ripple-of-hope:

50 Years

@9 months ago with 4302 notes
#kennedy #tribute #photojournalism #history 
Rue Robert Doisneau, Arles
vanesil:

Lindo nombre para una calle! #arles #doisneau #photo #france

Rue Robert Doisneau, Arles

vanesil:

Lindo nombre para una calle! #arles #doisneau #photo #france

@1 year ago with 4 notes
"40 years after Koudelka took his photo, looking down the bare Wenceslas Square towards the National Museum, I took this image from the steps of the National Museum, looking to where Koudelka stood at a time in history so unlike mine."
Read the whole story and see this great image by Miller Taylor on Flickr
found on: Koudelka Redux on We Seem to Be a Verb

"40 years after Koudelka took his photo, looking down the bare Wenceslas Square towards the National Museum, I took this image from the steps of the National Museum, looking to where Koudelka stood at a time in history so unlike mine."

Read the whole story and see this great image by Miller Taylor on Flickr

found on: Koudelka Redux on We Seem to Be a Verb

@1 year ago with 5 notes
#prague #photojournalism #Remake #josef koudelka 

Amazing collages made of photographs and patterns by Guy Catling. You should really check out his work.

(Source: brycoolviva, via taeramisu)

@7 months ago with 73938 notes
#collage #war photography #photojournalism #mixed media #patterns 

A comparison between portrait of supermodel Natalia Vodianova by Paolo Roversi and McCurry’s Afghan Girl. Creepy, relevant and captivating as per usual.

2311131949:

I always wondered why this promotional with Natalia Vodianova reminded me something else. I just find out. :) 

@9 months ago with 17 notes
#fashion #photojournalism #afghan girl #sharbat gula #natalia vodianova #steve mc curry #paolo roversi 

An Amazing Year of Déjà-Vu 

A perfect post for ending our year (together)

via David Campbell / davidc7 on Twitter

@9 months ago
#photography #time magazine #photojournalism #déja vu 
gunsandposes:

A Pulitzer-winning photo as interior decoration in Woody Allen’s Stardust Memories (1980)

gunsandposes:

A Pulitzer-winning photo as interior decoration in Woody Allen’s Stardust Memories (1980)

(Source: humanoidhistory)

@1 year ago with 29 notes
your-future-bestfriend:

“Rolling Stone’s Boston Bomber Cover Is Brilliant, Not Crass”

… As the Washington Post’s Erik Wemple points out, the image is exploitative—but it isn’t just exploitative: It’s also smart, unnerving journalism. By depicting a terrorist as sweet and handsome rather than ugly and terrifying, Rolling Stone has subverted our expectations and hinted at a larger truth. The cover presents a stark contrast with our usual image of terrorists. It asks, “What did we expect to see in Tsarnaev? What did we hope to see?” The answer, most likely, is a monster, a brutish dolt with outward manifestations of evil. What we get instead, however, is the most alarming sight of all: a boy who looks like someone we might know.

your-future-bestfriend:

Rolling Stone’s Boston Bomber Cover Is Brilliant, Not Crass”

… As the Washington Post’s Erik Wemple points out, the image is exploitative—but it isn’t just exploitative: It’s also smart, unnerving journalism. By depicting a terrorist as sweet and handsome rather than ugly and terrifying, Rolling Stone has subverted our expectations and hinted at a larger truth. The cover presents a stark contrast with our usual image of terrorists. It asks, “What did we expect to see in Tsarnaev? What did we hope to see?” The answer, most likely, is a monster, a brutish dolt with outward manifestations of evil. What we get instead, however, is the most alarming sight of all: a boy who looks like someone we might know.

(Source: adryhandjob)

@1 year ago with 13 notes